Editorials

From the United Way, a promising approach to fight hunger

Volunteers make 100,000 meals and meal supplements on Jan. 18, 2016 as part of the United Way's efforts on the Martin Luther King Day of Service.
Volunteers make 100,000 meals and meal supplements on Jan. 18, 2016 as part of the United Way's efforts on the Martin Luther King Day of Service. cseward@newsobserver.com

United Way of the Greater Triangle is helping to support a promising approach to getting food to children who live in homes where food is not always available. It’s helping children in low-income communities conceive and execute their own ideas on how to solve the problem.

United Way announced this week that it is awarding $50,000 to fund a Wake County school system proposal for a program called “Growing Youth Food Security Leaders.” Students will brainstorm solutions through their service clubs, and the grant will pay to put their ideas into action.

“It is so important that we begin to look at the children, who are faced with childhood hunger, as problem-solvers and not the problem. This innovation award allows us to involve the people most intimately impacted by childhood hunger with designing solutions to address the challenge,” said Brenda Elliott, an assistant superintendent for the Wake County school system.

United Way is also working to reduce hunger on other fronts. It awarded Urban Ministries of Wake County $25,000 for development of its Client Choice Pantry. The money will also support a nutrition education program for mothers of young children.

Another $20K went to East Durham Children’s Initiative to support its partnership with other local organizations that respond to local food needs. Finally, middle school students at Cary Academy received $5,000 to support a program that will provide children summer access to meals distributed at school bus stop locations.

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