Letters to the Editor

President’s actions continue to raise concerns

President Donald Trump listens during a press conference Thursday at the White House. He insisted there was no collusion between his presidential campaign and Russian officials and called the appointment of a special counsel to investigate possible ties with Russia “a witch hunt.”
President Donald Trump listens during a press conference Thursday at the White House. He insisted there was no collusion between his presidential campaign and Russian officials and called the appointment of a special counsel to investigate possible ties with Russia “a witch hunt.” AFP/Getty Images

Trump’s competency questioned

Regarding the May 18 news article “Mueller to lead Russia inquiry as special counsel”: The newly appointed special prosecutor will oversee the federal investigation into allegations Russia and President Donald Trump’s campaign collaborated to influence the 2016 presidential election.

There is a bigger question not being addressed: How qualified is Trump to be president? When is Congress going to address Trump’s competency and ability to govern?

Steve Berg

Chapel Hill

President is public servant

Regarding the May 16 news article “Trump revealed highly classified information to top Russian officials”: In his life before the White House, President Donald Trump was a CEO in the business world. Perhaps his numerous inexplicable and troubling actions in the Oval Office stem from his view that the United States is a large company, of which he is the CEO.

This would mean that he considers himself totally in charge – he is the boss and can do whatever he chooses – and the rest of America works for him. In fact, it is exactly the opposite. Trump is an elected public servant and he works for the rest of America. Unless that is a concept that he is able to grasp soon, the United States will continue to be immersed in the current chaotic reality show.

Sharon McDonald

Raleigh

Burr’s moment in history

Regarding the May 16 news article “Trump revealed highly classified information to top Russian officials”: U.S. Sen. Richard Burr’s moment in American history has arrived. The decisions he makes will affect the future of democracy and the safety of children.

For many months, possible connections between President Donald Trump’s administration and Russia have raised serious concerns. Recently, the firing of FBI Director James Comey forced some to ask: What are they trying to hide? And now there are reports that Trump revealed highly classified information to Russian diplomats at a meeting in the White House.

It is Burr’s responsibility to follow the evidence wherever it leads. Things have gone too far for politics and business as usual. Decisions made by Burr and the Senate Intelligence Committee will define his service to the nation and his place in history. We need Burr to get to the bottom of this mess and to share his findings with the American people.

Thomas Mitchell-Olds

Durham

Country before politics, power

Regarding the May 17 news article “Trump disclosures sow consternation in D.C.”: While President Donald Trump’s administration lurched from one crisis to another, the power-crazed GOP “faithfuls” refused to call the captain incompetent and demand a saner course.

Meanwhile, Trump has assembled a ridiculous Commission on Election Integrity to be co-chaired by Kris Kobach, who as Kansas secretary of state repeatedly made unsubstantiated voter-fraud allegations. And GOP legislators have refused to put an independent prosecutor in control of the Russia investigation.

When will the fate of the country be more important to these elected representatives than the party and power they continue to worship?

Theresa W. Moore

Raleigh

Washington events a ‘horror show’

Regarding the May 17 news article “Trump disclosures sow consternation in D.C.”: Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, said of President Donald Trump: “This man has been subject to more criticism than any predecessor that I know of. They hate him. They didn't like the fact that he won. He beat their favorite. It was a remarkable election.”

These were the same sentiments expressed when President Barack Obama won. How ironic.

Impeachment inquiries and demands are being voiced by the public not even six months into the presidency. This is a true reality horror show witnessed by the world, fearful for our planet’s future.

Maggie O’Keeffe

Apex

Congress needs to take action

Regarding the May 17 news article “Trump disclosures sow consternation in D.C.”: President Donald Trump’s mudslide is gathering mud and momentum.

Congress has to handle it. No more hiding, no more keeping quiet: This is hurting the country and it’s their job to protect and safeguard the U.S.

If they don’t, I promise that I and everyone else I know will do everything possible to unseat them. We’ll remember what they do.

Tom Sisk

Pittsboro

GOP hypocrisy evident

Regarding the May 17 news article “Trump disclosures sow consternation in D.C.”: Some might agree that had former President Barack Obama done what President Donald Trump has done, Republicans would have demanded impeachment.

Instead, the GOP is circling their wagons around Trump. Goodbye GOP, hello GHP – the Grand Hypocrisy Party.

Robert Dale Vance

Chapel Hill

Probe could benefit Burr

Regarding the May 11 news article “Burr probe recalls shades of Ervin”: It could be to great political advantage for Senate Intelligence Committee Chairman Richard Burr, R-N.C., if he were to pursue President Donald Trump as thoroughly as the late U.S. Sen. Sam Ervin did President Richard Nixon.

It’s a win-win for Burr. He now has the opportunity to become a national hero.

Stu Solomon

Chapel Hill

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