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NCAA says it'll adjust sports wagering, championship policies after Supreme Court ruling

Supreme Court lets states legalize sports betting in historic 6-3 decision

With a 6-3 vote, the Supreme Court ruled that legalizing sports betting should be left up to each state.
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With a 6-3 vote, the Supreme Court ruled that legalizing sports betting should be left up to each state.

The NCAA is open to adjusting its policies toward sports wagering after the Supreme Court struck down a federal law Monday that outlawed sports gambling in most states.

"Today the United States Supreme Court issued a clear decision that PASPA is unconstitutional, reversing the lower courts that held otherwise," NCAA chief legal officer Donald Remy said in a statement. "While we are still reviewing the decision to understand the overall implications to college sports, we will adjust sports wagering and championship policies to align with the direction from the court."

The Supreme Court ruled 6-3 to strike down the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act (PASPA). The 1992 law barred state-authorized sports gambling with some exceptions. It made Nevada the only state where a person could wager on the results of a single game.

Monday's decision opens the door for individual states to legalize sports betting.

Previously, the NCAA has been steadfastly against legal and illegal sports betting. The NCAA website has a section dedicated to sports wagering and it's "Don't Bet on It" campaign. It includes this statement:

"The NCAA opposes all forms of legal and illegal sports wagering, which has the potential to undermine the integrity of sports contests and jeopardizes the welfare of student-athletes and the intercollegiate athletics community. "

The NCAA has refused to hold championship events, most notably NCAA basketball tournament games, in Nevada.

In addition, the NCAA rulebook also states that staff members of the athletics department and student-athletes shall not knowingly:

(a) Provide information to individuals involved in organized gambling activities concerning intercollegiate athletics competition;

(b) Solicit a bet on any intercollegiate team;

(c) Accept a bet on any team representing the institution;

(d) Solicit or accept a bet on any intercollegiate competition for any item (e.g., cash, shirt, dinner) that has

tangible value; or

(e) Participate in any gambling activity that involves intercollegiate athletics or professional athletics, through

a bookmaker, a parlay card or any other method employed by organized gambling.

NCAA rules strictly prohibit student-athletes and athletics department staff members from sports wagering

on ANY intercollegiate or professional athletics contests.

Wagering/betting includes receiving or offering any item that has a tangible value (e.g., cash, clothes,

dinner) based on the outcome of an athletics event.



It is impermissible to provide information (i.e., injury status of UI athletes) to individuals who may use such

information for gambling purposes.



Internet gambling is impermissible. This includes fantasy leagues.



Any type of betting “pool” (e.g., March Madness, Super Bowl), including office pools and pools organized

by family, friends, neighbors, etc., for cash or other prizes is impermissible.



Participating in any gambling activity that involves intercollegiate athletics or professional athletics through

a bookmaker, a parlay card or any other method employed by organized gambling is prohibited.

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