Luke DeCock

NCAA committee vice-chair: “(HB2) adds another layer of complication”

NCAA president discusses impact of HB2 in North Carolina

VIDEO: NCAA president Mark Emmert discusses North Carolina's passing of HB2 and possible impact on hosting NCAA events in the future.
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VIDEO: NCAA president Mark Emmert discusses North Carolina's passing of HB2 and possible impact on hosting NCAA events in the future.

As the NCAA men's basketball committee – and committees for every sport – reach the final stretch of the decision-making process for championship sites for the 2017-18 through 2021-22 academic years, HB2 is making that process very difficult.

“It certainly does,” committee vice chairman Bruce Rasmussen, the athletic director at Creighton, said Wednesday. “We have roughly 60 bids we evaluate for sites in a certain site-selection process. As part of the bid process, (HB2) just adds another layer of complication to the process.”

The basketball committee would normally expect to award three or four bids to North Carolina during that four-year cycle, as it did during the last cycle, when Raleigh, Greensboro and Charlotte all were awarded first and second round hosting duties. Greensboro already lost 2017 to Greenville, S.C., while the NCAA's web site now lists 2018 as “TBA” instead of Charlotte.

North Carolina has been a hospitable and profitable home for the NCAA, but as the basketball committee enters the final stage of deliberations this week, it's under orders from the NCAA to eliminate all North Carolina bids from contention as long as HB2 is still on the books. The NCAA already has removed all neutral-site championships from North Carolina for 2016-17.

The Greater Raleigh Sports Alliance, N.C. State and PNC Arena submitted bids to host the first and second rounds in all four years and a regional in all four years, expecting to land one of the former and taking a shot in the dark at the latter.

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