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  • The Tuscarora fled NC after war in 1713. This week, they came back to Bertie County.

    Two dozen members of the Tuscarora Nation’s Turtle Clan returned for a conference about Indian Woods, the land set aside for the tribe after a devastating war with white settlers that sent them fleeing north in 1713. The nation still considers North Carolina an ancestral home, and they toured the Indian Woods reserve on Indigenous Peoples Day.

Two dozen members of the Tuscarora Nation’s Turtle Clan returned for a conference about Indian Woods, the land set aside for the tribe after a devastating war with white settlers that sent them fleeing north in 1713. The nation still considers North Carolina an ancestral home, and they toured the Indian Woods reserve on Indigenous Peoples Day. Josh Shaffer jshaffer@newsobserver.com
Two dozen members of the Tuscarora Nation’s Turtle Clan returned for a conference about Indian Woods, the land set aside for the tribe after a devastating war with white settlers that sent them fleeing north in 1713. The nation still considers North Carolina an ancestral home, and they toured the Indian Woods reserve on Indigenous Peoples Day. Josh Shaffer jshaffer@newsobserver.com

The Tuscarora fled NC after war in 1713. This week, they came back to Bertie County.

October 13, 2017 01:13 PM

UPDATED October 13, 2017 07:10 PM

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