Rob Bailey of Holly Springs heads to shore at Lake Crabtree on his standing paddle board late Wednesday afternoon, July 17, 2014. A large sign at right warns people not to take fish from the lake due to contamination from PCBs. Lake Crabtree is downstream from $82 million Superfund cleanup at the site of the Triangle’s nastiest industrial polluter, Ward Transformer Co. Ward’s half-century legacy of toxic PCB contamination will linger in the Raleigh area for many years to come, in creeks and lakes from Raleigh-Durham International Airport west of the city to the Neuse River on the east side.
Rob Bailey of Holly Springs heads to shore at Lake Crabtree on his standing paddle board late Wednesday afternoon, July 17, 2014. A large sign at right warns people not to take fish from the lake due to contamination from PCBs. Lake Crabtree is downstream from $82 million Superfund cleanup at the site of the Triangle’s nastiest industrial polluter, Ward Transformer Co. Ward’s half-century legacy of toxic PCB contamination will linger in the Raleigh area for many years to come, in creeks and lakes from Raleigh-Durham International Airport west of the city to the Neuse River on the east side. ssharpe@newsobserver.com
Rob Bailey of Holly Springs heads to shore at Lake Crabtree on his standing paddle board late Wednesday afternoon, July 17, 2014. A large sign at right warns people not to take fish from the lake due to contamination from PCBs. Lake Crabtree is downstream from $82 million Superfund cleanup at the site of the Triangle’s nastiest industrial polluter, Ward Transformer Co. Ward’s half-century legacy of toxic PCB contamination will linger in the Raleigh area for many years to come, in creeks and lakes from Raleigh-Durham International Airport west of the city to the Neuse River on the east side. ssharpe@newsobserver.com

Wake County

July 19, 2014 5:59 PM

Toxic cleanup shifts from dirt near RDU to region’s streams, lakes

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