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  • Raleigh public safety officers protest council decision on pay raises

    Matthew Cooper, president of the Raleigh Police Protective Association, leads a group of about 30 residents on Tuesday in protesting the Raleigh City Council's decision on Monday to reject big pay boosts for public safety officers. The city will likely give 3 percent raises - not the 5-15 percent raises some police and fire advocates have asked for.

Matthew Cooper, president of the Raleigh Police Protective Association, leads a group of about 30 residents on Tuesday in protesting the Raleigh City Council's decision on Monday to reject big pay boosts for public safety officers. The city will likely give 3 percent raises - not the 5-15 percent raises some police and fire advocates have asked for. Andy Specht aspecht@newsobserver.com
Matthew Cooper, president of the Raleigh Police Protective Association, leads a group of about 30 residents on Tuesday in protesting the Raleigh City Council's decision on Monday to reject big pay boosts for public safety officers. The city will likely give 3 percent raises - not the 5-15 percent raises some police and fire advocates have asked for. Andy Specht aspecht@newsobserver.com

Raleigh City Council rejects requested pay boost for emergency responders

June 13, 2016 7:01 PM

The Raleigh Report

The Raleigh Report

The Raleigh Report is your one-stop shop for everything Raleigh. Check here for the latest on city government, planning, the arts, roads, Falls Lake, events and more. This blog is updated by staff writers Paul A. Specht and Mechelle Hankerson.