"For students and families of color, our schools are poverty factories," says Mary Carey of the Bootstraps literacy organization, during an October 2015 press conference held by the Campaign for Racial Equity in our Schools. Most children of low-income families in North Carolina are stuck at the bottom of the economic ladder without a discernible path forward, according to a new report.
"For students and families of color, our schools are poverty factories," says Mary Carey of the Bootstraps literacy organization, during an October 2015 press conference held by the Campaign for Racial Equity in our Schools. Most children of low-income families in North Carolina are stuck at the bottom of the economic ladder without a discernible path forward, according to a new report. Mark Schultz mschultz@newsobserver.com
"For students and families of color, our schools are poverty factories," says Mary Carey of the Bootstraps literacy organization, during an October 2015 press conference held by the Campaign for Racial Equity in our Schools. Most children of low-income families in North Carolina are stuck at the bottom of the economic ladder without a discernible path forward, according to a new report. Mark Schultz mschultz@newsobserver.com

Report says upward mobility is worse in NC than in US

April 06, 2016 07:52 PM

UPDATED April 07, 2016 03:41 PM

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