Cuban migrant Yannier Rodriguez checks his cellphone in La Cruz, Costa Rica, near the border with Nicaragua. Rodriguez joined a highly organized, well-funded and increasingly successful homebrewed effort to make human traffickers obsolete by using smartphones and messaging apps on much of the 3,400-mile overland journey that's become Cubans' main route to the U.S.
Cuban migrant Yannier Rodriguez checks his cellphone in La Cruz, Costa Rica, near the border with Nicaragua. Rodriguez joined a highly organized, well-funded and increasingly successful homebrewed effort to make human traffickers obsolete by using smartphones and messaging apps on much of the 3,400-mile overland journey that's become Cubans' main route to the U.S. Esteban Felix Associated Press
Cuban migrant Yannier Rodriguez checks his cellphone in La Cruz, Costa Rica, near the border with Nicaragua. Rodriguez joined a highly organized, well-funded and increasingly successful homebrewed effort to make human traffickers obsolete by using smartphones and messaging apps on much of the 3,400-mile overland journey that's become Cubans' main route to the U.S. Esteban Felix Associated Press

Social media helps drive historic Cuban exodus to US

November 24, 2015 12:35 AM