Hundreds of hair-thin microfilament were implanted in the brains of two monkeys that were then passively trained to navigate a wheelchair to a bowl of grapes. Scientists then recorded the primates’ large-scale electrical brain activity and programmed a computer system to translate brain signals into digital motor commands that controlled movements of the wheelchair.
Hundreds of hair-thin microfilament were implanted in the brains of two monkeys that were then passively trained to navigate a wheelchair to a bowl of grapes. Scientists then recorded the primates’ large-scale electrical brain activity and programmed a computer system to translate brain signals into digital motor commands that controlled movements of the wheelchair. Shawn Rocco Duke Health
Hundreds of hair-thin microfilament were implanted in the brains of two monkeys that were then passively trained to navigate a wheelchair to a bowl of grapes. Scientists then recorded the primates’ large-scale electrical brain activity and programmed a computer system to translate brain signals into digital motor commands that controlled movements of the wheelchair. Shawn Rocco Duke Health

Monkeys drive wheelchairs – using only their thoughts

March 13, 2016 04:00 PM

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