Entertainment

J. Cole's surprise album 'KOD' has arrived, and now we know what the title means

Grammy-nominated J. Cole, seen November 2016,  announces a new album, 'KOD,' free New York show and album title. It will be released April 20, 2018.
Grammy-nominated J. Cole, seen November 2016, announces a new album, 'KOD,' free New York show and album title. It will be released April 20, 2018. AP

J. Cole's new album, "KOD," is finally here, and with that, confirmation about what the cryptic title means.

Friday, the album art seems to indicate it's "Kids on Drugs," but Cole tweeted that there are three meanings: Kids on Drugs, King Overdosed and Kill Our Demons.

"The rest of the album I leave to your interpretation," he wrote.

The flurry of activity started Monday when the Fayetteville rapper tweeted out a sparse announcement about a major piece of news: "New album. KOD 4/20," sending social media into a frenzy.

Twitter lit up with theories about what "KOD," the title of his fifth full-length studio album on Dreamville/Columbia Records, stands for. Guesses included "King of Dreamville," "Kiss of Death," "Kids on Drugs" and (in a reference to Pulitzer-winning Kendrick Lamar) "Kendrick on Dreamville."

New York-based hip-hop journalist Brian "B.Dot" Miller tweeted out a track list and an explanation that the title refers to "three different subtitles (kidz on drugz, king overdose, kill our demonz)."

Last-minute announcements are pretty much standard operating procedure for Cole's albums. And with every tweet comes a sense of excitement from his fans.

Take Monday. The Grammy-nominated rapper tweeted, then deleted, "It's time." He quickly followed up with an announcement of an impromptu concert in New York's Gramercy Theatre Monday night: "no phones, no cameras, no bags, no presslist, no guest list."

Tuesday morning, he tweeted out a similar pop-up concert announcement, this time in London at a secret location.

His previous release, 2016's "4 Your Eyez Only," also appeared with almost no advance fanfare. That didn't keep it from becoming his fourth million-selling album.

Cole, whose real name is Jermaine Cole, made headlines last November when he was featured in GQ magazine, as part of its cover piece declaring "Take a Knee" quarterback Colin Kaepernick as its "Citizen of the Year."

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