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More than 250,000 gallons of raw sewage spill into North Raleigh creek

Inside Raleigh’s aging sewer lines

Raleigh is using cameras to search for problems in sections of its aging sewer system, including this video that shows a major break and a significant crack in a line.
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Raleigh is using cameras to search for problems in sections of its aging sewer system, including this video that shows a major break and a significant crack in a line.

More than 250,000 gallons of raw sewage spilled into an unnamed North Raleigh creek Wednesday.

The spill was stopped at 10 a.m. Wednesday after about 259,890 gallons of untreated waste spilled into the creek near the intersection of Lead Mine and Strickland roads.

The unnamed tributary is in the Mine Creek Basin, according to a city of Raleigh news release.

There have been 17 sewage spills so far this year and 35 in the last 12 months, according to Ed Buchan, senior utilities analyst for the city.

The spill was caused by a build up of grease and debris inside the line, but the city is also investigating whether rain contributed to the spill, he said.

During heavy storms, water can enter older sewage pipes and cause sewage spills. While still not good for the environment, that sewage is often diluted by the rain water. A spill during dry weather is often not diluted and more raw sewage can spill out.

No dead fish were found after Wednesday’s spill.

Only water, human waste and toilet paper may be flushed down toilets and into the sewer system. If people smell excessive sewer odors or see a sewer spill, they should call the city at 919-996-3245.

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