At an informal tented settlement near the Syrian border on the outskirts of Mafraq, Jordan, Syrian refugee children pose for portraits. They are, clockwise from top left, Amna Zughayar, 9, from Deir el-Zour; Zahra Mahmoud, 5, from Deir el-Zour; Mohammed Bandar, 12, from Hama; Hiba So'od, 6, from Hassakeh; Mona Emad, 5, from Hassakeh and Rakan Raslan, 11, from Hama. About half of the 4.8 million Syrians who fled their homeland are children, and some of the most vulnerable live in dozens of makeshift tent camps, including Jordan, which has taken in close to 640,000 refugees. Children in these camps near the northern city of Mafraq say they miss their old lives in Syria, especially going to school.
At an informal tented settlement near the Syrian border on the outskirts of Mafraq, Jordan, Syrian refugee children pose for portraits. They are, clockwise from top left, Amna Zughayar, 9, from Deir el-Zour; Zahra Mahmoud, 5, from Deir el-Zour; Mohammed Bandar, 12, from Hama; Hiba So'od, 6, from Hassakeh; Mona Emad, 5, from Hassakeh and Rakan Raslan, 11, from Hama. About half of the 4.8 million Syrians who fled their homeland are children, and some of the most vulnerable live in dozens of makeshift tent camps, including Jordan, which has taken in close to 640,000 refugees. Children in these camps near the northern city of Mafraq say they miss their old lives in Syria, especially going to school. Muhammed Muheisen AP
At an informal tented settlement near the Syrian border on the outskirts of Mafraq, Jordan, Syrian refugee children pose for portraits. They are, clockwise from top left, Amna Zughayar, 9, from Deir el-Zour; Zahra Mahmoud, 5, from Deir el-Zour; Mohammed Bandar, 12, from Hama; Hiba So'od, 6, from Hassakeh; Mona Emad, 5, from Hassakeh and Rakan Raslan, 11, from Hama. About half of the 4.8 million Syrians who fled their homeland are children, and some of the most vulnerable live in dozens of makeshift tent camps, including Jordan, which has taken in close to 640,000 refugees. Children in these camps near the northern city of Mafraq say they miss their old lives in Syria, especially going to school. Muhammed Muheisen AP

Triangle groups offer ways to help refugees

December 30, 2016 04:58 PM

UPDATED December 31, 2016 02:25 PM

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