N.C. State junior Celeste Castillo, seen here studying on Oct. 4, 2017, inside the university’s Poe Hall, is a member of the first class of future educators to be considered for TIP Teaching Scholars Award Program. The award will pay 10 students up to $10,000 in exchange for a commitment to teach in rural North Carolina school districts for at least two years after graduation.
N.C. State junior Celeste Castillo, seen here studying on Oct. 4, 2017, inside the university’s Poe Hall, is a member of the first class of future educators to be considered for TIP Teaching Scholars Award Program. The award will pay 10 students up to $10,000 in exchange for a commitment to teach in rural North Carolina school districts for at least two years after graduation. Autumn Linford
N.C. State junior Celeste Castillo, seen here studying on Oct. 4, 2017, inside the university’s Poe Hall, is a member of the first class of future educators to be considered for TIP Teaching Scholars Award Program. The award will pay 10 students up to $10,000 in exchange for a commitment to teach in rural North Carolina school districts for at least two years after graduation. Autumn Linford

Many rural NC counties don’t have enough teachers. Can pay bonuses help change that?

October 09, 2017 11:39 AM

UPDATED October 09, 2017 09:14 PM

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