Opinion

Letters to the Editor

2/17 Letters: Magistrates’ religious beliefs shouldn’t keep them from doing their jobs

Regarding “You can’t make me perform same-sex marriages” (Feb. 15): It is inexplicable to me that Gayle Myrick dares to compare her choosing to leave her magistrate’s job because of her discriminatory religious beliefs regarding same-sex marriage with accommodations made for disabled employees, prison guards not having to participate in executions, and pregnant women not being required to engage in heavy lifting. None of her comparisons involves a public sector employer accommodating its employee’s wishes to engage in blatantly discriminatory conduct. Not even close.

Letters to the Editor

2/16 Letters: Confederate flags rising up is an ‘unintended consequence’

Regarding “Confederate flags could fly over multiple Orange County sites” (Feb. 10): This is called The Law of Unintended Consequences. Statues and monuments have stood for around 100 years, mostly becoming part of the scenery. Suddenly, the chronically offended found them to be easy targets. Aided and abetted by local governments fearful of losing votes, Yankees and guilt-ridden Southerners, they’ve been vandalized, moved, covered and had their names changed or removed.

Op-Ed

You can’t make me perform same-sex marriages

LGBT rights and religious liberty are often viewed as being at odds with each other. The Supreme Court has heard a case about whether a baker may decline to sell a wedding cake to a same-sex couple. Many people seem to think that both arguments cannot coexist, but my experience shows that is not the case. I learned this firsthand as a civil magistrate for the State of North Carolina.

Letters to the Editor

2/15 Letters: When it comes to SNAP, don’t fix what isn’t broken

Regarding “Trump wants to slash food stamps and replace them with a ‘Blue Apron-type program’” (Feb. 13): In 2011, North Carolina ranked number 19 in the nation in education. Now it is number 40. In that same period of time, there was a 25 percent increase in child poverty. Our state now has the 11th-highest child poverty rate in the country, tied with Texas and Kentucky. With one in six people “food insecure,” North Carolina is the 10th-hungriest state in the nation.

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