Entertainment

Travis Scott promised free tickets after delayed Raleigh show. Some are still waiting.

Travis Scott performs in the Super Bowl halftime show

Travis Scott performs with Adam Levine and Maroon 5 during the Super Bowl LIII halftime show in Atlanta on Feb. 3, 2019.
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Travis Scott performs with Adam Levine and Maroon 5 during the Super Bowl LIII halftime show in Atlanta on Feb. 3, 2019.

When chart-topping rapper Travis Scott played Raleigh’s PNC Arena Nov. 9, the show was beset with problems.

As part of a wave of early-tour production woes for Scott’s “Astroworld Tour” that affected several shows, Raleigh concert-goers were stranded outside for hours after the scheduled start time. When they were allowed inside, Scott didn’t appear onstage until nearly midnight.

Many concert-goers complained via social media, and Scott apologized for the delay, especially after some reported leaving before the show started. He promised everyone at PNC Arena that night a free “golden ticket” to another show as well a free T-shirt.

Nearly three months later — as his tour continues after his appearance at Sunday’s Super Bowl Halftime Show — many concert-goers say they still haven’t received their tickets. While there have been some reports of free tickets given out for Scott’s March 24 show at Charlotte’s Spectrum Arena, some complain they haven’t heard from anyone connected to the show, act or tour.

“I have not received any email correspondence from Ticketmaster or PNC about redeeming tickets, or T-shirts,” said James Scott, a computer sales person in Raleigh. “A few people I know did get codes to get free tickets. But I’d say more have not than have.”

James Scott said he spoke with Ticketmaster but they were unable to help.

Representatives for tour promoter Live Nation and Travis Scott himself, via his record label, did not respond to requests for comment.

In November, PNC Arena issued a statement apologizing for the “inconvenience,” and said “Elements of Travis Scott’s tour production were behind schedule arriving to the venue and loading in due to unforeseen circumstances. The venue was prepared for the event with staff in place. As soon as production checks were complete, guests were permitted into the building to enjoy the show.”

Even some people who were emailed ticket codes have come up empty. One was Laura Spivey of Greenville, who took her 19-year-old wheelchair-bound son to Scott’s Raleigh show. They had to leave early because of the delay, so she was happy to receive an email with a code for Charlotte tickets.

But when Spivey tried to redeem it two days later, she got a message that the code was invalid. She called Ticketmaster and said she was told that the free tickets were “limited to ‘just a few.’” She’s also heard nothing about the promised free T-shirts.

“The point is, if you promise a crowd something, you’d think they would reserve enough (tickets) for everyone to be able to redeem it,” Spivey said. “No way did they get to everyone in two days. Management should know that we did not receive what we were promised.”

Some have reported they received free tickets to the Charlotte show.

“I ended up getting not one but two free tickets by email to the Charlotte show,” said Caleb Srock, a junior at Raleigh’s Athens Drive High School.

Spivey did say that she was offered one thing for her trouble: a $20 Ticketmaster gift card.

“I told him just to save that,” she said.

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David Menconi has covered music and the arts for The News & Observer since 1991. He can be reached at 919-829-4759 or dmenconi@newsobserver.com.
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