Juana Luz Tobar Ortega has been living at St. Barnabas Episcopal Church in Greensboro for two weeks since getting a deportation order from the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Ortega, who emigrated from Guatemala to the U.S. almost 25 years ago, is the first person in North Carolina to obtain sanctuary in a church. Individuals seek sanctuary as a last resort to avoid deportation and to get more time to obtain at least a stay of removal that temporarily delays deportation. Ethan Hyman ehyman@newsobserver.com
Juana Luz Tobar Ortega has been living at St. Barnabas Episcopal Church in Greensboro for two weeks since getting a deportation order from the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Ortega, who emigrated from Guatemala to the U.S. almost 25 years ago, is the first person in North Carolina to obtain sanctuary in a church. Individuals seek sanctuary as a last resort to avoid deportation and to get more time to obtain at least a stay of removal that temporarily delays deportation. Ethan Hyman ehyman@newsobserver.com

Politics & Government

June 12, 2017 10:43 AM

Facing deportation, she sought sanctuary in a Greensboro church

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