Family

Family

John Rosemond: Let perfectionist son be a 4-year-old

Q: Whenever my 4-year-old son tries something new, he becomes very frustrated if he has any difficulty at all. This happens when practicing numbers, letters or anything else I try to teach him. I tell him he’s doing fine and will do better with practice, but it’s obviously not sinking in. In general, he’s a perfectionist in the sense that everything must be “just so.” It worries me because we have depression, anxiety and OCD on both sides of the family. I’ve also heard that perfectionism is characteristic of oldest children. Does that also apply to only children? Could it be a result of the fact that his father and I have been separated for a while now? What can I say to him in order to help him not be so hard on himself?

Books

Book review: Crossover tales will thrill fans of Riordan's books

Parents need to know that these three short stories, which combine main characters from Rick Riordan's Percy Jackson and Kane Chronicles series, were previously available separately as ebooks only. "The Son of Sobek" was released in 2013, "The Staff of Serapis" in 2014, and "The Crown of Ptolemy" in 2015. The hardcover book "Demigods and Magicians: Percy and Annabeth Meet the Kanes" includes all three stories, a forward by Percy Jackson, eight full-color illustrations, and a peek at the first chapter of "The Hidden Oracle," the start of a series to be released in May 2016. Kids will need to have read at least some of the main Percy Jackson series and the slightly more complex Kane Chronicle series to get what's going on when Greek mythology and Egyptian mythology and magic collide. Expect the same kinds of fantasy violence in these shorts that you saw in the other series - battles against monsters and gods where they get stabbed with swords or blown up. The good guys - all teens - get injured but heal with their magical nectar and potions. Readers will learn a bit about Alexander the Great and how he united the Greece and Egypt in his giant empire.

Family

Child Sense: Buckle up! It's National Seat Belt Enforcement Mobilization month

One of the most stated reasons for children not wearing a seat belts is the child's reluctance to do so. This can take the form of whining, undoing the seat belt or large physical style tantrums. Parents often relent especially if they are traveling a short distance. The fact is however, seat belts are necessary, without exception. A recent report stated that the majority of children injured in car accidents were not wearing seat belts, and those children suffered greater injuries than those properly restrained. So when tackling those resistant toddlers and preschoolers why not look to their dominate sense to aid with buckling up.

Family

Family Meals Matter: Make-ahead meals give Mom a break from cooking

Mother's Day is a perfect time to show Mom how much you care. You can also show her how much she means to you by giving her a well-deserved break from cooking. Instead of opting for reservations at a local restaurant, make it a learning experience for the whole family. Let mom put up her feet and have kids roll up their sleeves to help prepare these make-ahead breakfast and brunch dishes everyone is sure to love.

Family

App review: Monster-fighting and puzzle combo fun for fans

Parents need to know that "Flipped Out - The Powerpuff Girls Match 3 Puzzle / Fighting Action Game" sets the sisters from the TV series on a mission to save the town by mixing two modes of play - puzzle and action - to defeat an army of monsters. There's lots of dialogue about beating up the monsters, some of which glorifies using fists rather than brains to solve problems or emphasizes one of the character's forgetfulness.

Family

Game review: Controls can frustrate in tense, scary space-survival game

Parents need to know that "ADR1FT" is a survival adventure game. Players are the only active character in the game, uncovering details about the rest of the crew via text and audio logs left behind. These communications occasionally reference some of the crew's past behavior, including sexual relationships and drug use. Although there's no explicit violence in the game, the tense situation and how it's presented to the player if/when they begin to suffocate could be a bit intense for younger players.

Family

It can be hard to tell what's real when people use these apps

From Shakespeare to TV sitcoms, the idea of pretending to be someone you're not never gets old. In the online world, there's a name for it - "catfishing" - and it's common enough to have inspired a movie and a TV show. But creating a false persona isn't the only bait-and-switch game out there. New apps let kids boost, create, or totally fabricate reality, tapping into the pressure kids feel to project a certain public image. Teens are especially vulnerable, since a lot of their social lives play out online, and they may be tempted to lie using tech. Here's a sampling of the new tools that take catfishing to a whole new level.

Videos

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White House says Zika is worse than previously thought

Dr. Anthony Fauci, Director of NIH/NIAID, and Dr. Anne Schuchat, Principal Deputy Director of the CDC announced that the Zika virus may appear in as many as 30 states, can be transmitted sexually in addition to through mosquitos, and more during a press conference at the White House on April 11.
White House video
White House says Zika is worse than previously thought 02:09

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Bei Bei the baby panda climbs a tree 01:20

Bei Bei the baby panda climbs a tree

Icy conditions make for sledding fun for Raleigh children 01:01

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Ice, Ice Babies 01:21

Ice, Ice Babies